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Happy Thanksgiving From CSCS
Happy Thanksgiving From CSCS

By: Dan Hausman

As I reflect on wonderful Thanksgiving holiday and weekend, it is nice to look back at the history of Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving began, in what is now America, in 1619 as a way for people to give thanks for the prior year and for the harvest. George Washington declared the first nationwide thanksgiving celebration in the United States of America to be November 26, 1789, "as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favours of Almighty God."

Thanksgiving has evolved throughout the years, as the holiday has come to be not only about thanks but also as a time for families and friends who reside all over the United States to get together with one another and enjoy Thanksgiving traditions.

Thanksgiving has always been a time to reflect on our blessings and give thanks. Our attorneys and claims managers did just that as they responded to the question, what aspect of the legal system are you thankful for?

“I am thankful for the opportunity for all to have equal access to our justice system, irrespective of economic or social status.” - Ira Sherman, Esq.

“I am thankful for our right to a jury trial, which allows us to achieve full justice. One of the country's Founding Fathers said this was the greatest right that we all have as Americans. It allows the community to decide what is right and wrong and it eliminates governmental interference in those decisions.” - Joseph Cammarata, Esq.

“I am thankful that we have a third branch of government (the court system) that provides checks and balances on the abuse of power by anyone who does not follow the rule of law. Whether it is a case against an irresponsible driver, an insurance company, a big corporation, or a politician, our American legal system is open to all individuals to have their voice heard.” - Allan Siegel, Esq.

“I am thankful that we live in a country with a legal system that holds, as a principle, that any person who has been legally wronged can seek justice in the courts and obtain a remedy from the wrongdoer.” - Matthew Tievsky, Esq.

“I’m thankful that finding the truth is the foundation of our legal system. When you are involved in a dispute and the truth is on your side, the legal system is extremely likely to resolve that dispute in your favor.” – Dan B. Hausman, Esq.

“I am thankful that I can tell my clients, ‘Not to worry; we will take care of everything. All you need to do is get better.’ That assurance is possible because we live in a country with a tort system that allows those without financial means to obtain the services of legal professionals. - Stephen P. Ollar, Esq.

“I am thankful and grateful that I live in a country where no one, regardless of race, national origin, gender, religion or sexual orientation has less or more equal legal rights than the next person.” - Erik McConnell, Claims Manager (Not an attorney)

“I’m thankful for being a part of an organization that advocated for those who can’t for themselves.” - Rand Chatman, Claims Manager (Not an attorney)

Our CSCS family is thankful for the opportunity to represent all of our clients. We hope your family had a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday!

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Recent Posts
  • Happy Thanksgiving From CSCS

    By: Dan Hausman

    As I reflect on wonderful Thanksgiving holiday and weekend, it is nice to look back at the history of Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving began, in what is now America, in 1619 as a way for people to give thanks for the prior year and for the harvest. George Washington declared the first nationwide thanksgiving celebration in the United States of America to be November 26, 1789, "as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favours of Almighty God."

    Thanksgiving has evolved throughout the years, as the holiday has come to be not only about thanks but also as a time for families and friends who reside all over the United States to get together with one another and enjoy Thanksgiving traditions.

    Thanksgiving has always been a time to reflect on our blessings and give thanks. Our attorneys and claims managers did just that as they responded to the question, what aspect of the legal system are you thankful for?

    “I am thankful for the opportunity for all to have equal access to our justice system, irrespective of economic or social status.” - Ira Sherman, Esq.

    “I am thankful for our right to a jury trial, which allows us to achieve full justice. One of the country's Founding Fathers said this was the greatest right that we all have as Americans. It allows the community to decide what is right and wrong and it eliminates governmental interference in those decisions.” - Joseph Cammarata, Esq.

    “I am thankful that we have a third branch of government (the court system) that provides checks and balances on the abuse of power by anyone who does not follow the rule of law. Whether it is a case against an irresponsible driver, an insurance company, a big corporation, or a politician, our American legal system is open to all individuals to have their voice heard.” - Allan Siegel, Esq.

    “I am thankful that we live in a country with a legal system that holds, as a principle, that any person who has been legally wronged can seek justice in the courts and obtain a remedy from the wrongdoer.” - Matthew Tievsky, Esq.

    “I’m thankful that finding the truth is the foundation of our legal system. When you are involved in a dispute and the truth is on your side, the legal system is extremely likely to resolve that dispute in your favor.” – Dan B. Hausman, Esq.

    “I am thankful that I can tell my clients, ‘Not to worry; we will take care of everything. All you need to do is get better.’ That assurance is possible because we live in a country with a tort system that allows those without financial means to obtain the services of legal professionals. - Stephen P. Ollar, Esq.

    “I am thankful and grateful that I live in a country where no one, regardless of race, national origin, gender, religion or sexual orientation has less or more equal legal rights than the next person.” - Erik McConnell, Claims Manager (Not an attorney)

    “I’m thankful for being a part of an organization that advocated for those who can’t for themselves.” - Rand Chatman, Claims Manager (Not an attorney)

    Our CSCS family is thankful for the opportunity to represent all of our clients. We hope your family had a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday!

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  • Myths and Facts About Concussions

    By: Matthew Tievsky

    We’ve all heard of the term “concussion,” but what does it mean? In our practice, with unfortunate frequency we see clients who have suffered concussions. We also see too many misunderstandings about concussions, which often cause people to underestimate how serious they are, and how common they are.

    A concussion is a brain injury caused by trauma. Specifically, a concussion is caused when the brain is shaken within the skull, which causes stress upon the tissue of the brain.

    Concussions are often caused by a blow to the head, but you can suffer a concussion even if nothing hits your head. For example, if you are in an auto collision and you jerk forward and back, your brain may be shaken within your skull by that movement, which can cause damage.

    Concussions often are accompanied by a loss of consciousness, but you can suffer a concussion even without blacking out. A loss of consciousness is merely one possible symptom of a concussion. Other potential symptoms include headaches, loss of balance, ringing in the ears, changes in taste or smell, nausea, and sudden mood changes.

    Concussions generally do not show up on diagnostic scans. After head injuries, doctors often give patients CT scans or MRIs of the head. These scans are useful, but they cannot necessarily detect concussions, which are often invisible to scans. This means that if you’ve been to the hospital following an injury, and the doctors tell you that the scans of your head don’t show an injury, you may still have suffered a concussion.

    If you have been injured and suspect you may have suffered a concussion, it’s best to see a neurologist – a doctor who specializes in brain injuries. And if the injury was caused by someone else’s wrongful conduct, then you should also contact an attorney who has experience with brain injury cases. At Chaikin, Sherman, Cammarata & Siegel, P.C., we have extensive experience handling brain injury cases, and you can contact us for a free consultation.

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  • Pope Writes to Catholics that "No Effort Must be Spared" to End Sexual Abuse in Church

    By: CSCS

    Pope Francis wrote: “We showed no care for the little ones; we abandoned them,” in a 2,000 word letter to the world’s Catholics. How very true that is. The letter was publicized amidst numerous scandals involving allegations of sexual abuse by leaders of the Catholic Church.

    As the Washington Post reported, a Pennsylvania grand-jury released a report last week detailing seven decades of abuse by 300 priests. Francis wrote: “Looking ahead to the future, no effort must be spared to create a culture able to prevent such [abuses] from happening, but also to prevent the possibility of their being covered up and perpetuated […].”

    At the very least, the letter seems to indicate a slow acceptance by the Catholic Church that the abuse is perpetuated by a tolerant culture to such abuses. Historically, the church has covered up such scandals and buried them in secrecy. Acknowledgement of the serious abuse problem within the church is a small step, but a significant one. Such abuse should not be tolerated, and there should be real consequences for those who have perpetuated or willfully ignored it within the Church hierarchy.

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  • DC Cyclists & Pedestrians Protest Recent Deaths

    By: CSCS

    Malik Habib was with his brother the night he was killed on June 23rd. “[W]e were just riding our bikes, doing a food delivery service on our bicycles,” recalls Cyrus. Malik's tire got caught in a streetcar track on H Street, NE, and he was hit and killed by a bus. Cyrus was just 10 feet from him when it happened.

    Laura Montiel, Cyrus and Malik's mother, spoke publicly for the first time recently at a protest organized by the Washington Area Bicyclist Association outside of the Wilson Building. “My son did not have to die! Safety now.” She also said,“I am not an avid cyclist, I am a mother who lost her child.”

    Within two weeks after Malik's death, 36 year-old Jeffery Long was killed while riding in the protected bike lane on M Street, NW. He was hit by a truck turning right. In 2015, DC launched 'Vision Zero,' with the goal of having zero traffic-related deaths by 2024. Since the launch of that campaign, traffic deaths have sadly increased.

    In 2018 alone, there have already been 21 deaths, which is already higher than last year. Whatever DC believes it is doing to work towards Vision Zero, it clearly is not working. DC needs to take a good, long look at its policies, revamp them, and implement real solutions as soon as possible, before yet another life gets taken.

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  • Former Alabama Football Player Discuss Brain Injury & Pending Lawsuit Against NCAA

    By: CSCS

    In a recent interview with the Washington Post, Les Williams, a former defense end at Alabama in the 2000s, discussed his ongoing brain injury symptoms and how it is affecting his life. When he was at Alabama, like many young athletes at that time, he had never even heard the word “concussion,” that is until after he was done playing football. He most certainly sustained a concussion during his tenure at Alabama. He reflected on one specific play that he called ‘the hit.’ In ‘the hit’ Williams smashed his helmet into the side of a Southern Mississippi punter, Mark Haulman, and Haulman flew out of bounds. This play made the Top 10 plays on “SportsCenter.” Williams described that after the fact, that while the fans were cheering, he knew something was not right. “I knew I made a mistake the way that I hit him,” Williams said. “From that day forward, my life really hasn’t been the same.”

    Williams now experiences ongoing memory loss, depression, constant headaches, and occasional fits of rage, all a result of brain injury sustained while playing football. This has made it difficult for him to hold down a job and has created great difficulties in his personal life. He eventually joined over 100 former NCAA football players in suing the NCAA for its failure to protect the players from the risks of long-term brain damage, which is a clear result of repeated hits to the head.

    The cases are consolidated before one federal judge in Chicago. NCAA Motions to Dismiss are currently under review, and decisions are expected to come out in the next few weeks. If approved, cases such as Williams’ would be a huge step forward in these players obtaining just compensation for their injuries, and the adverse effects of traumatic brain injuries on their loved ones and on their lives.

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  • Despite Significant Death Toll, Trump Administration Rule Change Could Stop Public Reporting of Hospital Infections

    By: CSCS

    It’s simply important data for everyone in this country, and the Trump Administration is proposing of getting rid of it, despite no alleged lobbying from Hospital groups. Currently, hospitals must disclose publically the “super bug” MRSA, post-operative sepsis and surgical site infections, as well as a range of injuries and accidents from bedsores to post-operative respiratory failure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) proposed plan, part of a complicated five hundred page rule, would halt this public disclosure.

    To put this into perspective, it is a fact that more than 600,000 hospital patients contract an infection, and sepsis alone kills approximately 270,000 people per year. The point of such reporting is to increase transparency, public awareness, and by default, patient safety. It is strange that CMS is lobbying for decreased hospital transparency, and a lack thereof will make it easier for the governing bodies of hospitals to ignore such outbreaks, and for the public to remain completely unaware that they even occurred.

    As stated to USA Today, “The public should be concerned whenever there is a national effort in health care to withhold information, to not provide us with accurate information about hospital infections and other harms, or to otherwise adversely impact transparency," says infection control expert Larry Muscarella, who owns LFM Healthcare Solutions and the blog Discussions in Infection Control. "In my opinion, such efforts are suspect unless independently documented to improve patient care and reduce spiraling costs.”

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